Gujarat Unlock News

Tata Motors acquires Ford’s Sanand plant for Rs 725 crore
The Indian Express | 3 days ago | |
The Indian Express
3 days ago | |

Tata Passenger Electric Mobility Limited (TPEML), a subsidiary of Tata Motors Ltd, has signed an agreement with Ford India Private Limited (FIPL) for the acquisition of its manufacturing plant at Sanand, Gujarat for Rs 725.7 crore.This Unit Transfer Agreement (UTA) includes entire land and buildings, vehicle manufacturing plant along with machinery and equipment, and the transfer of all eligible employees of FIPL’s vehicle manufacturing operations at Sanand, said a statement.FIPL will continue to operate its Powertrain Manufacturing Facility by leasing back the land and buildings of the Powertrain Manufacturing Plant from TPEML on mutually agreed terms. TPEML has agreed to offer employment to the eligible employees of FIPL’s Powertrain Manufacturing Plant in the event of FIPL’s cessation of such operations, the release added.The closure of the transaction will be subject to the receipt of relevant approvals from the government authorities and fulfilment of customary condition precedents. The government of Gujarat, TPEML and FIPL had already executed a tripartite MoU on May 30 to support all relevant approvals for the transaction.“With our manufacturing capacity nearing saturation, this acquisition is timely and a win-win for all stakeholders. It will unlock a state-of-the-art manufacturing capacity of 300,000 units per annum which is scalable to 420,000 units per annum,” the company stated.TPEML would make the necessary investments to reconfigure the plant to adapt to Tata Motors’ existing and future vehicle platforms. The unit is adjacent to the existing manufacturing facility of Tata Motors Passenger Vehicles Limited at Sanand, which should help in a smooth transition.“The agreement with FIPL signed today is beneficial to all stakeholders and reflects Tata Motors strong aspiration to further strengthen its market position in the Passenger Vehicles segment and to continue to build on its leadership position in the Electric Vehicle segment,” said Shailesh Chandra, Managing Director, Tata Motors Passenger Vehicles Limited and Tata Passenger Electric Mobility Limited.“It will accelerate the growth and development of the Indian auto industry by taking a progressive step forward towards building a future ready Atmanirbhar Bharat,” said Chandra.Steve Armstrong, Transformation Officer of Ford Motor Company, said: “Today’s announcement marks an important step forward in Ford’s ongoing business restructuring in India, which is part of our Ford+ plan for strategic transformation. With the transfer of employment for eligible vehicle manufacturing employees included in the agreement, this milestone also highlights our best effort in caring for those impacted by the restructuring.”

Tata Motors acquires Ford’s Sanand plant for Rs 725 crore
  • Tata Motors To Buy Ford India's Manufacturing Plant For $91 Million
  • Ndtv

    Tata Motors inks pact to acquire Ford India's Sanand plant for Rs 726 croreTata Motors Ltd signed an agreement on Sunday to buy Ford Motor's manufacturing plant in the western state of Gujarat for $91.5 million (Rs 726 crore).The agreement between the Indian automaker's subsidiary Tata Passenger Electric Mobility Ltd (TPEML) and Ford India Pvt Ltd (FIPL) covers land, assets and all eligible employees."With our manufacturing capacity nearing saturation, this acquisition is timely and a win-win for all stakeholders," Tata Motors said in a statement.The Jaguar Land Rover parent said the acquisition of the Sanand plant will unlock a manufacturing capacity of 300,000 units per year that could increase to 420,000.PromotedListen to the latest songs, only on JioSaavn.comFord had less than 2 per cent of the Indian passenger vehicle market when it stopped production in the country last year, having struggled for more than two decades to generate profits.($1 = 79.3600 Indian rupees)

Ahmedabad man creates ‘touch-me-not’ puzzle, inspired by the plant’s shyness
The Indian Express | 5 days ago | |
The Indian Express
5 days ago | |

This story is part of our upcoming section, Puzzles & Games. For updates, sign up on indianexpress.com or follow our Instagram (@iepuzzles).At first glance, you’d think Abhishek Ruikar named his own game wrong. A researcher from Ahmedabad, Ruikar is the creator of Mimosa: a tactile puzzle box that has left solvers worldwide delighted and intrigued.Is it ironic to name a hands-on game after a hands-off plant? Maybe, but as Ruikar reveals — and players soon come to realise — there is more to this christening than meets the eye.The touch-me-not plant (Mimosa pudica) is one of nature’s passive curiosities. At some point, we’ve all aimlessly brushed it to get a reaction. Ruikar’s Mimosa, on the other hand, reminds players of the complex system governing the original plant, paying respectful tribute to its sensitivity.There is no goading this Mimosa to react; instead, a solver must discover an exact sequence of light movements and touches — which may or may not involve hidden tools — to be able to unlock the puzzle’s solution. In the world of brain games, this is known as a sequential discovery puzzle:As a crafts researcher, Ruikar’s interest in puzzle design was a natural extension. But his first creation wasn’t as complex as Mimosa, nor was it for sale. Instead, it was a birthday gift for a friend — a game called ‘five holes and a key’, inspired by his hobby of solving puzzles for leisure.It’s a pastime with a sizable following in the US and Europe. But for India, it’s still a small dot on the game charts. And for good reason: there aren’t enough local retailers here selling enjoyable, high-quality puzzles for adults. Beyond jigsaws, there is low public awareness. And puzzles shipped from abroad have a markup like collector’s items, burning a hole in one’s pocket.Thus, puzzling as a long-term hobby has been restricted to the upper crust of Indian society — much like the mechanical keyboard community.Ruikar also mentions a psychological barrier: many people don’t like mixing leisure with critical thinking. “People are very intimidated by puzzles, particularly ones that need deeper thought and understanding,” he says. This is a complaint echoed by online puzzle makers, who found Indian players were quick to give up on games that needed lateral thinking, which is the solving of problems using creative, patient and unusual approaches.The only way to get past this fear, feels Ruikar, is to create awareness about the fun and diversity in puzzles right from school, marking a clear boundary between brain games and the drudgery of exams. “I believe having puzzle-solving pop-ups or workshops might help encourage the youth,” says the designer, an idea he is willing to help build across schools, colleges and design institutes using his diverse creations:With global appreciation for Mimosa, Ruikar has now dived into puzzle designing full-time, relying on international interest and websites like JP Games, Etsy, Puzzle Paradise and Puzzle Master Inc. for sales and personal motivation. ‘Clouds’ and ‘B:MAZE’ are some of his newest creations. This is a niche but emerging market, one that holds great promise for buyers and creators if subsidised pricing and distribution can be worked out in India.To build on the desi connect, Ruikar thinks collaborating with Indian craftsmen is the next best step. Our handicraft communities hold centuries of traditional knowledge about working with sustainable materials. When combined with a modern-day designer’s sensibilities, this could produce an entirely new breed of mechanical puzzles — a domain that is yet to move away from heavy plastic use.As one of the country’s few puzzle designers, the sky’s the limit right now for Ruikar and any contemporaries. If you were in his place, what kind of puzzles would you make for Indian players?Abhishek Ruikar is a puzzle designer and Senior Research Assistant at the DICRC, CEPT University in Ahmedabad. All of his puzzles are available at a discount in India with direct orders to abhishek.puzzles@gmail.com.

Ahmedabad man creates ‘touch-me-not’ puzzle, inspired by the plant’s shyness