Gujarat Rain News

New captain Hardik Pandya raises hope in a rain-hit tie that handed a series win to India
The Indian Express | 4 days ago | |
The Indian Express
4 days ago | |

There is a sense of Déjà vu to this. A T20 series win against New Zealand under a new captain, coming closely on the heels of an embarrassing T20 World Cup exit. A perception of a new awakening, only for the story to repeat itself at the biggest showpiece event in the format – the T20 World Cup. Time will tell how this turns out. When Rohit Sharma led India on to the field at Jaipur on November 17, 2020, just three days after the Black Caps lost the T20 World Cup final in Dubai, it was supposed to usher in a new era. New faces came in, new combinations were tried, a new-found approach was injected in, experiments became the theme for the next 10 months. In the end, when the T20 World Cup arrived a year later, England showed in the semifinals how out of depth India are in the format.And as India clinched the series in Napier with a 1-0 scoreline after the third and final T20I ended in a tie, (rains arrived when India needed one more run to be considered victors as per Duckworth-Lewis) the lingering question on everyone’s lips is where do they go from here. India finish on par with the DLS score and the match ends in a tie 👀🇮🇳 take the series 1-0 👏📝 Scorecard: https://t.co/UAVgFPPafs pic.twitter.com/Zttel3CUcM— ICC (@ICC) November 22, 2022For all the talk of change of approach, entering the T20 World Cup in Australia with a similar batting unit from the previous edition proved to be the biggest undoing. And over here in New Zealand, India sent in a different squad, mostly comprising of players who will be integral to the team going forward. Of course, there are a few back home like Prithvi Shaw, but there is surely time for it.When the Chetan Sharma-led selection panel handed over the reins to Rohit Sharma – a decorated T20 captain with most IPL titles, it seemed a logical decision. Never mind the fact, at 34, he was a year older than Virat Kohli. Successful T20 sides, unless it happens to be Chennai Super Kings, don’t fall up on an older captain to replace the incumbent. It is a format where you are constantly told to move forward. But with India, names and reputations take precedence. Which is why the latest T20 World Cup debacle has not just woken up the team, but even the board.A new selection panel will take charge soon and although they have their task cut out, it is no means going to be as challenging as it is being made out to be. In Hardik Pandya, they have a captain, who seems to be ready-made for the format. As he showed in the IPL with Gujarat Titans, and his fans keep reminding us on social media how there are similarities with MS Dhoni especially in the manner in which he is keeping it simple.For instance, at McLean Park, Devon Conway and Glenn Phillips were running away with the game for New Zealand with an 86-run stand for the third wicket. With each over, the momentum was tilting the Kiwis way as the hosts were placed 105/2 at the end of 13 overs. With Arsheep Singh, Harshal Patel to take care of the death overs, Pandya didn’t hesitate to bowl out Bhuvneshwar Kumar – who has struggled to bowl at the death – by the 14th over. Never mind the fact that Bhuvneshwar ended up conceding 15 runs in the over, it allowed Pandya to fall back on specialists in the end. And he also had the luxury of Mohammed Siraj, who had pegged back the hosts with the wicket of Mark Chapman in the last over of powerplay. It meant Conway and Phillips had to consolidate first. Mohammed Siraj is adjudged Player of the Match for his brilliant bowling figures of 4/17 as the final T20I ends in a tie on DLS.Scorecard – https://t.co/rUlivZ308H #NZvIND pic.twitter.com/kSHPp8wFTx— BCCI (@BCCI) November 22, 2022While the left-right swiftly changed gears as the innings progressed, Pandya’s move to keep the specialists for the death brought India back into the game. Off the last six overs, India ended up conceding only 40 runs and accounted for eight wickets with Siraj and Arshdeep ending-up with four wickets each as New Zealand eventually folded up for 160.Given the short boundaries on either side of the square, it was total well below par. And New Zealand, as expected, came out on the attack and India were equally up to it. With forecasts of rain around, India’s top-order didn’t waste any time to get off the blocks. Though it led to quick wickets – Ishan Kishan, Rishabh Pant, Shreyas Iyer and Suryakumar Yadav, the fact that they never let the innings stall meant India’s total of 75/4 at the end of 9 overs was on par with DLS score. It was good enough to give them a series win.And as the rain poured at the McLean Park, and the umbrellas came out, another bilateral series was done and dusted. It may not live in the memory for long, but for India there is plenty to take home about. They have the players in place, it is over to the selectors to pick the players ahead of big names and reputations.Brief scores: New Zealand 160 in 19.4 overs (Devon Conway 59, Glen Phillips 54, Mohammed Siraj 4/17, Arshdeep Singh 4/37) tied with India 75/4 in 9 overs (Hardik Pandya 30 n.o) via DLS method.

New captain Hardik Pandya raises hope in a rain-hit tie that handed a series win to India
‘Being in Opp can’t be an alibi’: Vasoya makes MLA work hard sell in Dhoraji
The Indian Express | 5 days ago | |
The Indian Express
5 days ago | |

“Do you pay wages to a person who has laboured on your farm for harvesting and threshing groundnut, one who has picked cotton and sprayed pesticides on the crop, or to the one roaming around in the village just because he is good-looking? Who do you owe wages,” Lalit Vasoya, the sitting Congress MLA from Gujarat’s Dhoraji Assembly constituency, asks a small gathering of farmers in Vadla village in Upleta taluka in Rajkot district, even as a crowd was building up in nearby Dhoraji town for Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s public meeting Sunday as part of his campaign for the BJP candidates for the upcoming state Assembly polls.Struck by the question, some men from the gathering respond: “Of course to the one labouring on our farmlands.”Seizing on their words, the MLA tells them: “You are right. You pay to the one who labours on your farm. Similarly, I have toiled for your village for five years. Today, it is time for you to pay me my wages. I have come to seek compensation in the form of votes for the work I have done for you.”Vasoya, a prominent Patidar leader, then reels off details of some of his works – building the village’s internal roads at a cost of Rs10.80 lakh and constructing a burial ground’s compound wall at a cost of Rs 80,000 from his MLA local area development (LAD) fund.To drive home the point that he had “favoured” Vadla with a population of around 1,000 despite having trailed by a few votes in the 2017 Assembly election from the polling booth here, Vasoya says, “MLA gets Rs 1.5 crore LAD grant annually. If I were to distribute this grant equally among 82 villages and three municipalities in Dhoraji-Upleta area as per their population and take into account the LAD suspension for one year due to Covid, I can allot Rs 30,000 to your village annually. That means Rs 1.20 lakh in five years. But paying special attention to your village, I allotted my development fund to Vadla, even at the cost of other villages. Therefore, I have the right to seek votes here.”Vasoya, 60, tells farmers that Vadla was among the 18 villages of Upleta which received excessive rainfall this monsoon but were not included by the BJP-ruled state government for surveying crop damage and compensation. “We called a meeting of people of 18 villages in Upleta, then made representations in Gandhinagar and created a ruckus in the Assembly and ensured that farmers of Vadla get compensation against excessive rain. I had told village leaders that if I fail to get you compensation against excessive rain, don’t vote for me in the election. So, this is how I have worked.”Vasoya, who was the Saurashtra zone convener of the Patidar Anamat Andolan Samiti (PAAS) which was leading the Patidar quota agitation, was given ticket by the Congress to fight his maiden election from Dhoraji in the 2017 polls, which he clinched by defeating BJP candidate Hari Patel.While campaigning for his 2017 bid, Vasoya had announced that he would use his MLA salary for welfare of people and not for personal use. While campaigning for his re-election as a Congress candidate in 2022, he gives an account to his voters in this regard.“Over the past five years, I got a total of Rs 49.50 lakh as salary… Using that money, I organised 34 health screening camps in Dhoraji, Upleta and Bhayavadar areas where free diagnoses were done and medicines distributed. Twelve extremely poor patients were operated upon free. We ran a community kitchen for 21 days during Covid-19 outbreak and fed daily 5,000 initially and then 14,000. From the balance, we installed ceiling fans in anganwadis, gave school uniforms to poor girls studying in government schools, and sent nutrition kits to villages for malnourished and stunted children,” he tells Vadla residents.While campaigning in nearby Sevantra village, Vasoya tells people that their drinking water woes are going to end soon as the Venu-Moj group drinking water supply project to supply treated drinking water to 48 villages of the area is nearing completion.“Under the Nal Se Jal scheme of the Central government, the state government has launched one pilot project each in south Gujarat, central Gujarat, north Gujarat and Saurashtra region. Under the project, sumps will be constructed in villages and piped water will be available even if the feeder line fails for a couple of days,” Vasoya says.“There are many BJP MLAs from Saurashtra. Even ministers are from areas near us. But I used my rapport with then water supply minister Kunvarji Bavaliya to good use despite his switch to the BJP and brought the pilot project to Upleta so that a sump of drinking water is constructed in your village too,” the MLA tells the villagers, adding he had shared the details of the project with them on their WhatsApp accounts.He also tells Sevantra residents how he and his team drove to Surat and arranged 21 luxury buses for people who wanted to return to their native villages in Upelta and Dhoraji talukas during the Covid lockdown in 2020. “We even sent our personal vehicle to help people reach their homes in their villages,” he claims, crediting himself for the community health centre in Upleta being upgraded to a 100-bed hospital at a cost of Rs 16 crore.In Kerala, a village on the bank of Moj river, Bachu Vamrotiya, a village leader, tries to corner Vasoya by complaining about the difficulties faced by farmers to cross the river during the monsoon and how his village has been left out of the crop loss survey on account of excessive rain. “Despite being an Opposition MLA, I have got approved roads and bridges worth Rs 350 crore in Upleta and Dhoraji. I have already allotted Rs 2 lakh for a causeway across Moj river in your village,” Vasoya replies.“But farmers would have got Rs 65 lakh compensation had our village been included among those affected by excessive rain,” Vamrotiya continues. Pacifying him, the politician says, “Wouldn’t I like to claim credit for getting this done? The fact is, the BJP government has excluded a few villages due to narrow political consideratons. Therefore, we have filed a petition in the Gujarat High Court, demanding Kerala and four other villages should also be surveyed and farmers be compensated.”Vasoya barely mentions any state or national leader of the Congress party during his campaign, with Dhoraji being scheduled for polling in the first phase on December 1. “I have to cover 82 villages and three municipality areas for campaigning in few days. I hardly get around 10 minutes to talk during which I barely manage to give account of work we did over the past five years in this constituency,” he tells The Indian Express.Vasoya targets the BJP over price rise and its candidate, Prof Mahendra Padalia, the Rajkot-based former chancellor of Saurashtra University who is a native of Paneli village in Upleta taluka. Calling the BJP candidate an “outsider”, he asks a gathering in Dumiyani village, “Does anyone of you know him? Have you ever seen him?” As the crowd responds negatively, he goes on: “It is our misfortune that every time, BJP fields an outsider in this seat despite having strong local workers. BJP brings people from Rajkot so that the party doen’t have to face people after election. You can easily stop me in the middle of the street but where will you go to find him?”Hari Patel is also a resident of Rajkot and so is Praveen Makadia, the BJP leader who was elected from this seat before Vasoya in a bypoll.The Congress MLA later tells the Express that an Opposition legislator could not rely on excuses that because he is from an Opposition party the works in his constituency could not be done. “You have to raise your voice when needed but you should also have the humility to bow down for the sake of your people. I personally requested agriculture minister Raghavji Patel to include 10 villages in the damage survey. He agreed to include five,” he says.Vasoya also quashes buzz about him cosying up to the BJP. “I meet former minister Jayesh Radadiya and Porbandar MP Ramesh Dhaduk at community events because we are from the same community. I am also a big farmer leader from Saurashtra. Then why is it that media reports that Vasoya is drifting towards the BJP and not Radadiya warming up to Congress.This is because the BJP knows that they won’t be able to defeat me through ballot so they want to create confusion in minds of people by spreading such conspiracy theories,” he charges.

‘Being in Opp can’t be an alibi’: Vasoya makes MLA work hard sell in Dhoraji
Daily Briefing: Imran Khan attacked; surge in teacher exits during pandemic; and more
The Indian Express | 3 weeks ago | |
The Indian Express
3 weeks ago | |

Good morning,Get your day started with the top reads from today’s edition.Big Story The threat of violence has hung over former Pakistan PM Imran Khan’s “long march” even before it began in October. During a bizarre press conference a few days ago, a leader of Khan’s Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf predicted widespread violence: “There will be bodies everywhere, there will be blood, there will be more bodies.”The ominous premonition has proven to be true. 🔴 Here’s what happened: On Thursday evening, Khan was injured after shots were fired at his reception camp in the Gujranwala town. 🔴 Imran launches attack: He raised the stakes immediately by naming three persons he alleged were behind the attack – Prime Minister Sharif; Interior Minister Rana Sanaullah, and a “Major General Faisal”, a reference to Major General Faisal Naseer, head of counter-intelligence at ISI, brought in during a recent round of transfers from Balochistan, where he was involved in special operations.🔴 So what happens to the march? The attempt on Khan’s life now puts even Army chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa and PM Shehbaz Sharif in a tighter corner. It is not clear yet if the long march will go on, but with the PTI leader in hospital and undergoing surgery, it seems unlikely to continue.Only in the ExpressIn our opinion section today, Surjit S Bhalla and Karan Bhasin write on how there has been a persistent decline in poverty: “No matter how you look at data, it is visibly evident that the pace of decline in poverty, whether measured through the conventional unidimensional way or through using modern multidimensional measures, accelerated post-2014. India’s poverty decline was already remarkable before 2014. Now, it is second to none.”From the Front Page During the second wave of the Covid pandemic, more than 20,000 schools shut down and close to 1.89 lakh teachers exited the workforce, shows the Unified District Information System for Education Plus (UDISE+) data for the year 2021-22. Reflecting economic distress, there was an almost two-fold rise in the transfer of students from private to government schools as compared to the first year of the pandemic. Read some of the findings of the report. Is she, isn’t she? As forest officials at the Kuno-Palpur National Park prepare to move the cheetahs out of their quarantine bomas into a larger enclosure, the big guessing game is over the pregnancy status of Asha, one of the eight big cats that were flown in from Namibia on September 17.Must Read From resentment among farmers to the recent Morbi tragedy, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) has its worries as Gujarat braces for a fierce assembly election. The party that has been in power for 27 years in the state has stepped up its strategies with PM Narendra Modi and Amit Shah making frequent visits to the state. As surveys show the state yearns for a change, we break down the ruling party’s challenges and its strategies.Meanwhile in Himachal, political parties have intensified their campaign ahead of the voting on November 12. A week to go for campaigning to wrap up in the hill state, Here are the 10 key constituencies in the state and its politics.As the US Federal Reserve announced  interest rate hike again, we explain its possible impact on Indian markets and investors. And Finally The rain break played a crucial role in India’s victory against Bangladesh in the T20 match.  Masseurs kept the players’ muscles relaxed, a video analyst was doing the D/L math, Rohit Sharma tried to convince his edgy counterpart to play and the throwdown specialist was readying to prevent the fast bowlers from slipping. Devendra Pandey writes on how Team India regrouped during the rain break in the game versus Bangladesh. Delhi Confidential: The Government will  showcase the achievements of the special cleanliness campaign carried out between October 2 and the end of the month on Friday. The drive, which was also carried out in toll plazas across the country, has earned a little over Rs 7 lakh from selling scrap. 🎧 In today’s episode of the ‘3 things’ podcast, we look at Delhi’s worsening air quality, the challenges before the upcoming UN Climate conference, and the attack against Imran Khan. Until tomorrow,Rahel Philipose and Aneesa PA 

Daily Briefing: Imran Khan attacked; surge in teacher exits during pandemic; and more
  • Pandemic effect: Dip in number of schools, surge in teacher exits
  • The Indian Express

    The second wave of Covid-19 hit India’s school education with over 20,000 schools — just over 1 per cent of the total number — shutting down and close to 1.89 lakh teachers — almost two per cent of their total — exiting the work force. That’s not all. Reflecting economic distress, there was an almost two-fold rise in the transfer of students from private to government schools as compared to the first year of the pandemic, shows the Unified District Information System for Education Plus (UDISE+) data for the year 2021-22.Schools were hit during the first wave of Covid-19 as well but the crisis exacerbated after the Delta variant, show a comparative analysis of the latest UDISE+ report with the previous ones.The drop in the number of schools, from 15.09 lakh in 2020-21 to 14.89 lakh in 2021-22, is significant given that this is the second dip in school count since UDISE counting came to be managed by the Department of School Education and Literacy in 2018-19. Among schools that shut down, the share of private schools was 24% and government schools were 48%, with government-aided schools and “others” making up the rest.The report shows that the trend of students shifting from private to government schools also deepened during the last financial year, showing the economic cost of the pandemic marked by job losses and pay cuts. The period saw enrollment in govt schools increase by 83.35 lakh while in private schools it dipped by 68.85 lakh.“The decline in total schools is mainly due to closure of schools under private and other management,” the ministry of education said in a statement, also identifying “grouping/clustering of schools by various states” as another factor behind the decline. The report, however, did not go into the possible factors behind the fall in the number of teachers and the worsening of other indicators such as drop-out rates.Separate data on merged schools was not immediately available. Also, Madhya Pradesh alone accounts for a drop of 6,457 government schools (66.82% of the total drop in government schools) and 1,167 private schools, almost 24% of the total private schools shut. These are the highest for any state or UT.Past UDISE reports show that the last drop was between 2018-19 and 2019-20, when it came down by 43,292 (2.79 per cent). But that drop was driven primarily by the merger of government schools as the number of private schools had risen by 11,271 during the same period.Across UTs and states, except Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal, Telangana and Goa, there were less teachers in 2021-22 than 2020-21. Between 2019-20 and 202–21, the category of teachers recorded a rise of 8848, while the number of schools had increased by 1428.In the latest round, Rajasthan, where as many as 1197 private schools shut down and there were 31,148 less teachers than the previous year, was among the worst-hit. The number of government schools in the state was down by 135.Odisha, where the number of schools dropped by 1984 including 289 run privately, there was a reduction of 24,638 teachers, followed by Karnataka (22937), Punjab (21940), Bihar (18643), Assam (17397) and Gujarat (10687). There was a drop in teacher numbers even in states where not many schools have shut.For instance, in Bihar the number of government and private schools rose by 3 and 174 respectively. However, the number of teachers in the state dropped by 18,643, which indicates that many schools that managed to stay afloat curtailed staff strength substantially as the pandemic showed no signs of abating, leading to prolonged school closures.The UDISE+ report, released by the Ministry of Education, observed that although the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is cross-cutting, “this is particularly noticed in the enrolment of young and vulnerable kids like pre-primary classes may be attributed to postponement of admissions due to COVID-19.”The enrollment in pre-primary sections (excluding anganwadis run by the Ministry of Women and Child Development) dropped by 11.5 lakh, while the primary level (1-5) registered a drop of 1.79 lakh.Moreover, drop out increased at primary level from 0.8 to 1.45 per cent and at upper primary level from 1.9 to 3.02 per cent. At the secondary-level, however, it reduced from 14.6 to 12.61 per cent.The Gross Enrolment Ratio (GER), which denotes the enrolment in a specific level of education as a fraction of the population in that age-group most age-appropriate for that level of education, dipped marginally from 79.8 to 79.56 at the secondary level. It rose across other levels though.“The GER of primary was 101.3% in 2018-19 which increased to 104.8% in 2021-22. The GER for upper primary in 2021-22 is 94.7%. It was 87.74% in 2018-19. GER at higher secondary level has also shown improvement as it reached 57.6% in 2021-22 from 50.14 in 2018-19 showing significant increase,” notes the report. A GER over 100 per cent might indicate the presence of over or under-age children in a particular level of education.

UN Chief Visits India's First Solar-Powered Village In Gujarat
Ndtv | 1 month ago | |
Ndtv
1 month ago | |

Villagers told him that they were saving on energy billsModhera: United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres on Thursday said the people of Modhera, India's first solar-powered village, are setting an example of "reconciliation between humankind and planet".While the village in Gujarat's Mehsana district has a centuries-old Sun temple, a new kind of Sun temple has come up there now, he said.Guterres, on a three-day visit to India since Wednesday, visited the village, its 11th century Sun temple, and interacted with some of its 1,300-odd families who have set up solar electricity generation panels in their houses.Villagers told him that they were saving on energy bills and were happy to use clean energy that benefits the environment.The residents of Modhera were "the soldiers of the first line" in the battle to save the earth, the UN chief said."What is amazing and (for) what we must thank in a very emotional way these people of this village and also the government of Gujarat and government of India is that here is reconciliation between humankind and the planet," he said."Here where the temple of Sun was built a thousand of years ago, a new temple of Sun is based on solar energy," Guterres said.Solar energy is transforming the lives of the local people, making them more healthy, giving them more prosperity and at the same time contributing to the "rescue of our planet from climate change that is still driving without control," he said.The ancestors of these villagers recognised that the Sun was the source of all energy, the UN chief said.But a thousand years later, we live in a world where we use energy from coal, gas and oil, and the burning of coal makes the Sun "angry" which makes the planet warmer and causes floods, he said."When I was a boy, there used to be rain for a given number of months. Now in many parts of the world there is no longer rain, there is drought and then storms and floods...no normal rain," said 73-year-old Guterres who was born in Portugal.Referring to a woman from the village who switched from coal to solar power, Guterres said she is "making peace with the Sun, and peace with nature." India is moving ahead fast in solar power generation but "some people don't like it, they are using huge amounts of money from oil and gas," he said."But we need to go on doing what you did. One thousand years ago people recognised that the Sun was the origin of our energies, one thousand years later you are making the Sun again the origin of all energies," he said.PromotedListen to the latest songs, only on JioSaavn.com(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

UN Chief Visits India's First Solar-Powered Village In Gujarat
After slow pandemic years, high demand for diyas lights up Dharavi’s potter colony
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

WITH DIWALI around the corner, Chetan Chauhan (42), is busy attending to customers to sell earthen diyas in the congested lanes of Kumbharwada, also known as potter colony, in the century-old pottery hub of Asia’s largest slum Dharavi. After two years of suffering huge losses during the Covid-19 pandemic, his business has finally taken off again ahead of the festival of light.“The public is also keen to celebrate Diwali whole-heartedly after two years of the pandemic. The response is overwhelming,” Chauhan told The Indian Express, as customers around him flocked to buy the colourful diyas.On a daily basis, he is handling business worth nearly Rs 80,000, which also involves corporate clients. But amid the pandemic, it had dropped to a meagre Rs 10,000 per day. Chauhan has a total of 19 workers who work in his shop and his pottery factory.When asked how much business he is expecting this Diwali, he said, “I am hoping I will be able to go up to Rs 25 lakh, considering the high demand.”Last year, Chauhan did business of around Rs 5 lakh only.Ravindra Solanki (51) said that with the huge demand, he has already recovered the money invested in manufacturing. “This year, we will have the money to celebrate Diwali with sweets,” he said with a smile.Kumbharwada is a community of around 400 families that was built by migrants from Gujarat over 100 years ago. Throughout the year, they make traditional pots, vases, diyas, and decorative items. Diwali is one of the biggest money-making festivals for the potters.Every year, the colony’s residents who follow the traditional method of making the diyas—drying them in the sun and baking them in the kiln – complain that they are losing business to Chinese LED lights. But this time, there is a change in trend as people are opting for traditional earthen diyas over Chinese decorative lights.“There has been a change in emotion in the last two years. Earthen diyas are considered more sacred and festive than electric lights. People are more sensitive after surviving the pandemic, so they want to get more devotional items rather than only decorations,” said Brijesh Prajapati (45), who belongs to one of themigrant families.Some potters in Kumbharwada said that during the national lockdown, with no income and increasing apprehension, many families had sent their women members to their hometowns in Gujarat or Rajasthan. Now, with gradual revival of the business, they have been called back, and they are helping to colour and design the diyas to make those more decorative.“The price of labour is still high, so my wife is helping me with the colouring,” said Harish Jetwa (50) whose family business is pottery.However, heavy rainfall in the last four months has cast a shadow on their happiness. The potters lamented that the rain has affected the supply of both the raw and finished material from neighbouring districts like Gujarat, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh, which is leading to a shortage of diyas against the high demand.“The potters always prioritise international bulk orders from the US and Europe. So, the early stock is already over, as it has been exported. Now, we are struggling to arrange diyas from districts which have been hit by prolonged rainfall,” said Jetwa.“In fact, in our colony, production has remained low due to unprecedented rain,” he said.This has also pushed up the price of diyas compared to pre-pandemic years. But Chauhan said that despite the price rise, customers are buying the diyas. “As there is a shortage of diyas and people are eager to celebrate this year, they are buying them at a higher price, without complaints,” he said.

After slow pandemic years, high demand for diyas lights up Dharavi’s potter colony
Gujarat groundnut production to drop due to rain damage: Oil millers’ body
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

Due to a drop in the acreage and unseasonal rains early this month, the groundnut production in the state will come down to 29 lakh metric tonnes (lt) in the crop year 2022-23 (July-June)—a drop of around 4 lt compared to the previous year, the Saurashtra Oil Mills Association (SOMA) said Monday. The SOMA estimate is marginally lower than 30 lt estimated by the Solvent Extractors Association of India (SEA).According to a SOMA crop estimate survey report, the state will harvest 29.06 lt groundnut in 2022-23. This figure is 4.5 lt lower than the previous year’s SOMA estimate of 33.5 lt. “The groundnut acreage in Gujarat dropped to 17 lakh hectares (lh) in the Kharif 2022 season. This is the lowest in the past three years and more than 4 lakh hectares lower as compared to the peak of 21 lakh hectares recorded in kharif 2020 and 3 lakh hectare lower as compared to last year’s area of 19.26 lakh hectare. Coupled with the unseasonal rain early this month which damaged harvested crops in Surendranagar and Gir Somnath districts, this reduction in acreage will pull the overall production of groundnut down in Gujarat this Kharif season,” Kishor Viradiya, SOMA chairman said.The First Advance Estimate of the state government has pegged the groundnut production at 39.17 lt—lower than previous year’s 43.59 lt. Last year, SEA had pegged Gujarat’s groundnut production at a record 38.55 lt. “The government’s estimate was released in August when the crop was maturing and therefore, may not give a realistic estimate of the crop size,” Viradiya said.Gujarat accounts for half of India’s groundnut production. But SEA highlighted that the groundnut area has dropped by 10.52 per cent this year compared to the previous season as farmers have planted more cotton and opted for soybean. “This year, the excessive rain-damaged crops in certain areas will lead to a reduction of yield by 22.18 per cent. The total production is reported at 30.0 lakh MT compared to last year’s record production of 38.55 lakh tonnes,” SEA said in a release, adding the last five-year average production in Gujarat has been about 30.5 lt. Kharif groundnut sown in June-July in Gujarat is harvested in October-November and marketed during October-March. Currently, the oilseed is being sold at Rs 1,300 per mann or 20 kg—substantially higher than the Rs 1,170 minimum support price (MSP) announced by the Centre for this year (Rs5850 per quintal). “Prices of groundnut and groundnut oil are likely to remain firm as, on the one hand, production is declining at a time when hand-picked and selected (HPS) groundnuts is becoming increasingly popular as table food and as ingredient in products such as the chutney served along with dosa in South India. Around 70 per cent of groundnut is consumed by this segment, leaving just about a third for crushing and producing groundnut oil. Therefore, prices will remain at elevated levels in near future,” Viradiya added.A 15-kg tin of groundnut oil is currently trading at Rs 2,900 in the retail market in Rajkot. “Only about 10 per cent of around 125 oil mills in Saurashtra are operational as their pipelines are empty and the groundnut price is costly at the beginning of the marketing season,” added Viradiya.

Gujarat groundnut production to drop due to rain damage: Oil millers’ body
Mumbai: Heavy rain lashes city again, monsoon withdrawal likely to be delayed
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

The withdrawal of monsoon from Mumbai is likely to get delayed by a few more days as rain continued to lash the city on Friday evening. Earlier, forecasting a possibility of thunderstorms, accompanied with light to moderate rains and gusty winds in Mumbai, the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) had issued an yellow alert for Friday (October 14) and Sunday (October 16).Till 5.30 pm on Friday, IMD’s Santacruz observatory recorded 13.3 millimetres (mm) of rainfall. The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation’s (BMC) rainfall data showed that areas in eastern suburbs recorded rainfall above 50 mm. The BMC data stated that Vikhroli experienced 61 mm of rain till 7 pm on Friday, followed by 51 mm in Ghatkopar. Nearly 36 mm of rain was recorded in Andheri and Vile Parle in the western suburbs. Meanwhile, Antop Hill and Wadala recorded 30 mm and 16 mm of rain, respectively, on Friday. The rainfall recorded by IMD’s observatory in October currently stands at 167 mm, the third highest figure in the last 10 years. “Friday onward, the monsoon started to withdraw from northern parts of central Maharashtra, namely Dhule, Jalgaon and Nandurbar. Currently, there is presence of moisture in Mumbai weather, therefore it will take some time for the monsoon to entirely withdraw from here,” said an IMD official. Mahesh Palawat, a weather expert and meteorologist from Skymet weathers, said there is possibility of monsoon withdrawal from Mumbai in the next 10 days. “Between September and October, two low-pressure points had developed in the Bay of Bengal, which later moved towards Madhya Pradesh. Whenever there is a low-pressure movement in central India, rainfall in Maharashtra and Gujarat intensifies. This is the reason why we are recording rainfall in October this year,” said Palawat.Meanwhile, eight incoming flights to Mumbai were diverted to various nearby airports due to heavy rain in Mumbai.Authorities of Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj International Airport have advised all passengers to check their flight status with the respective airlines, said a spokesperson of Mumbai airport.

Mumbai: Heavy rain lashes city again, monsoon withdrawal likely to be delayed
  • Heavy rain lashes east Rajasthan, UP, Haryana; IMD forecasts rain for two more days
  • The Indian Express

    The India Meteorological Department (IMD) has forecast rainfall over Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, west Madhya Pradesh and Haryana till Tuesday.Uttar Pradesh has been receiving rain towards the end of the season. This is unusual for the second week of October, especially over western Uttar Pradesh, where some of the wettest locations on Sunday were Chandausi with 190 mm rain, Aligarh and Baheri (160 mm each), Narora (140 mm), Kasganj (110 mm) and Vridavan (90 mm).In near-record rainfall over eastern Rajasthan in October, many places in Alwar and Bharatpur districts recorded extremely heavy rain — more than 204 mm in 24-hours. These included Sewabundh (230 mm), Kotkasim (210 mm), Bharatpur tehsil (180 mm) and Viratnagar and Govindgarh (150 mm each).According to the IMD, there is a cyclonic circulation over east Rajasthan and its interactions with the fresh western disturbances will make conditions more favourable for thunderstorms, lightning and fairly widespread light to moderate intensity rainfall along east Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh over the next two days.From this cyclonic circulation, there is a trough running till Gujarat due to which there has been an increase in rainfall over Gujarat. Delhi on Friday recorded 74 mm rainfall in 24-hours.This year, the monsoon withdrawal has remained nearly stalled due to the cyclonic circulation formed in the Bay of Bengal, which moved towards Uttar Pradesh last week. There is a delay of seven to 10 days in the monsoon withdrawal from parts of Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, southwest Gujarat and Madhya Pradesh.The coming week will also see rainfall picking up over Maharashtra due to the increasing moisture coming in from both the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal, said IMD, Pune.Likewise, Tamil Nadu, the Karaikal coastal Andhra Pradesh, Puducherry, Yanam and Kerala, too, will experience wet days till October 13.

  • Rain lashes Surat, south Gujarat
  • Times of India

    SURAT: The city and parts of Surat district started receiving rain since Friday night and rain continued throughout the day on Saturday. It led to waterlogging in parts of the city for a couple of hours on Saturday. Because of rain in the catchment area of Ukai reservoir, inflow of water at the dam was recorded at 66,050 cusecs while 52,414 cusecs of water was being released from the dam. Water level at Ukai dam was 345.12ft against the maximum water level of 345ft The water level at the weir-cum-causeway in the city was at 7.35 metre and 77,255 cusecs of water was being released from it. On Friday, Subir in Dang district received 109mm rain which was the highest in the state for the day. Heavy rain continued in other parts of south Gujarat on Saturday as well. Umarpada in Surat district received 57mm rain since 6am on Saturday. In Surat district’s Palsana taluka, 53mm rain was recorded while in Jalalpore of Navsari 51mm rain was reported. Olpad in Surat received 47mm rain while 19mm rain was reported in Bardoli. In Surat city, 15mm rain was reported. It led to waterlogging in parts of the city for a couple of hours. Traffic movement was obstructed on Kadodara road and Sachin road in Pandesara. Later, water receded. Citizens were stuck in traffic jams at many places due to heavy traffic on roads.

  • Gujarat: Parts of state to receive rain till Oct 11, says IMD
  • The Indian Express

    Monsoon was active over Gujarat Friday as districts of Dang, Surat, Kheda, Amreli, Mahisagar, Anand, Vadodara and Sabarkantha received heavy rainfall and were among 94 total talukas to record rainfall. The weather department has issued a forecast of light to moderate rainfall across the state till October 11. As the Southwest monsoon has not completely withdrawn from Gujarat, the state is expected to receive rainfall in the coming days, said India Meteorological Department (IMD) officials.“The withdrawal of southwest monsoon from the state is not complete. Central and South parts of the state are likely to receive good rainfall till October 11,” IMD regional director Manorama Mohanty told The Indian Express.For Saturday, heavy rains in the districts of South Gujarat region namely Bharuch and Surat are expected, stated the weather department.On October 9, heavy rains very likely at isolated places in the districts of South Gujarat region namely Bharuch and Surat and October 10 in the districts of North Gujarat region namely Aravalli and Mahisagar.

Captain’s daughter Jai Inder visits mandis, lends an ear to farmers
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

Jai Inder Kaur, daughter of former Punjab chief minister Captain Amarinder Singh, who also joined BJP recently with her father, visited grain markets at Sirhind and Khanna on Thursday to hear the grievances of farmers.Talking to the media after her visit to the Khanna mandi in Ludhiana district, Kaur said, “For the last few days we have been getting complaints from all over Punjab that the grain procurement process wasn’t going well and farmers are facing issues. Today after visiting both Sirhind (in Fatehgarh Sahib district) and Khanna, I can confirm that the procurement process is going very slowly and farmers are truly unhappy.”She said, “Already farmers are facing a lot of hardship due to ‘China virus’ that has destroyed crops of many of our ‘annadatas’ and now the incessant rain is also bringing down the yield. But instead of helping out our farmers, the AAP government has left them to their own devices, not even procuring the produce that has already arrived in the mandis.”Kaur also met with Fatehgarh Sahib Deputy Commissioner Parneet Shergill and raised the issues being faced by farmers in Sirhind mandi.On stubble burning, Kaur said, “Farmers have also informed me that they haven’t received any stubble management machines from the government. Also, no compensation has been fixed by the government. And if out of compulsion they burn stubble, then the administration is red listing them which is totally unfair. I have assured them of full support of Jatt Mahasabha and also my family, and I will also urge my father to take up this matter with the central government.”Launching a scathing attack on the AAP government, she said, “Rain, bad weather and slow lifting are posing problems in the procurement process, but Punjab CM, his ministers and MLAs are uninterested in all this and are focusing only on campaigning in Gujarat. The farmers have been forced to sit on protest against the CM outside his house for their demands, but Bhagwant Mann isn’t listening to them.”

Captain’s daughter Jai Inder visits mandis, lends an ear to farmers
3-day Gujarat visit: PM to unveil health projects worth Rs 712 cr next week
The Indian Express | 1 month ago | |
The Indian Express
1 month ago | |

Prime Minister Narendra Modi will lay foundation stones for various healthcare facilities worth Rs 712 crore, including a new hostel building and treatment facilities at UN Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Centre (UNMICRC) and a new 850-bed facility of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) in Ahmedabad, during his three-day visit to Gujarat from October 9 to October 11.At UNMICRC, he will lay the foundation stone of the new hostel building with 176 rooms, a central library and a museum worth Rs 71 crore. He will also inaugurate facilities for advanced heart treatment worth Rs 54 crore that would include a centre for heart and lung transplantation, mobile ECMO, virtual simulation cardiac cath lab for cardiac surgery trainees, robotic cardiac surgery system, minimal invasive cardiac surgery, 150 critical cardiac beds, mother’s breast milk bank, sleep lab and a cardiac rehabilitation centre, among others.At IKDRC, a 850-bed facility comprising 22 hi-tech operation theatres and 12 ICUs built at Rs 408 crore will be inaugurated.A new building of Gujarat Cancer and Research Institute (GCRI), which includes a laboratory equipped with next-generation sequencing machines, built at a cost of Rs 140 crore will also be inaugurated. A foundation stone will also be laid for a shelter home (rain basera), which would cost Rs 39 crore, for the families of patients.

3-day Gujarat visit: PM to unveil health projects worth Rs 712 cr next week
  • PM Modi to lay foundation stone of healthcare facilities worth Rs 712 crore at Ahmedabad Civil Hospital
  • Times of India

    AHMEDABAD: Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be visiting Gujarat from October 9 to 11. During this visit, he will dedicate and lay foundation stone of various healthcare facilities worth Rs 712 crore. Foundation Stone of facilities worth Rs 712 crore The new hostel building, worth Rs71 crore, of UN Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Centre will be dedicated by the Prime Minister. This 10-storey hostel has 2 basements,176 rooms and a central library with a museum. Apart from this, state-of-the-art machines and world-class facilities worth Rs 54 crore will be launched for advanced heart treatment. It includes center for heart and lung transplantation, mobile ECMO, VAD, , CRRT Machine, Virtual Simulation Cardiac Cath Lab for Cardiac Surgery Trainees, Robotic Cardiac Surgery System, Minimal Invasive Cardiac Surgery, Tele I.C.C.U. (Paperless ICU), 150 Critical Cardiac Beds, Coronary Graft – Floor Measurement Meter, R.F. Ablation Machine, Homograph Valve Bank, Mother Milk Bank, Sleep Lab, Cardiac Rehabilitation Center, 3 Tesla Cardiac MRI Machine, Blood Center and 3D/4D Cardiac Echo Machine. Dedication of new building of GCRI and IKDRC The new hospital building of the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Center (IKDRC), built at a cost of Rs 408 crore, will be dedicated by the PM at Asarwa. It has 850 beds. There will be 22 hi-tech operation theaters, 12 ICUs, modern laboratory and a facility to perform 62 dialysis simultaneously. The new building ‘C’ of Gujarat Cancer and Research at a cost of Rs 140 crore will be inaugurated in Medi-city. Due to this, the number of beds in General Ward will increase to 187 and Bone Marrow Transplant will increase from 4 to 11. The laboratory is equipped with next generation sequencing machines. The building will have facilities including library, 317 seat auditorium, telemedicine room, board room and canteen. He will also lay foundation stone for a shelter home to accommodate families of poor patients. This Rain Basera will be constructed in an area of 5800 square meters at a cost of Rs 39 crore.

All roads lead to garba grounds after Covid lull
The Indian Express | 2 months ago | |
The Indian Express
2 months ago | |

Garbas are back and the state is all set to witness its grandeur with Navratri beginning on Monday, two years after the Covid-19 pandemic halted the celebrations.All roads lead to garba grounds in Vadodara, even before the actual festival has commenced. Several local garba organisers in Manjalpur, Karelibaug, Waghodia Road and other areas organised “ratris before Navratri” over the weekend on Saturday and Sunday, to allow patrons two additional days of merriment.Kapil Shah, a resident of Manjalpur, who attended a garba at a local ground in the area on Saturday, said, “Now that the pandemic is almost over, normalcy is back… markets are open and people are excited to get garba costumes made, check on the latest garba playlists and add new steps into the performances… We are looking forward. The pre-Navratri garba had a huge crowd.”Tarak Patel, vice-chairman of the Resources Development Committee (RDC) of United Way of Baroda — the biggest garba in Vadodara — said that they have decided to make the venue more vibrant to beat the blues that Covid-19 has left behind.Patel told The Indian Express, “The decorations will be more colorful and vibrant as garbas will be held after two years. We have additional lighting arrangements. Singer Atul Purohit has already announced the launch of three new garba (songs) this year.”UWB, which will hold its event at a ground in Kalali for the first time, has already got around 35,000 registrations so far. “We are expecting 35,000 to 38,000 players daily, apart from spectators. This year, the ground in Kalali is more approachable from the main road and has ample parking space. Since Gandhi Jayanti coincides with Navratri, we have decided to announce a tricolour dress code for the players. We will also play the national anthem to pay tribute to Mahatma Gandhi…,” said Tarak Patel.The Vadodara Navratri Festival (VNF), which will be held at its usual venue in Navlakhi, has also planned “surprises” for the players. Mayank Patel of VNF said, “We have set up food courts at both entry points with delicacies from across Gujarat. After Covid-19 restrictions interrupted garbas for two years, this year, the organisers are making it more interesting for the participants. We have surprises… it will be revealed during the nine nights.” VNF has got close to 45,000 registrations, Mayank Patel said.The organisers have already put out a list of the songs to allow groups to choreograph the garbas.Mitanshi Parikh, a student, who is attending VNF, said her group of friends had hired a choreographer. “We are a group of 15… Every year, we choreograph our own steps but this time, since we are playing commercial garba after long, we hired a choreographer. We want to make this garba very special. We have practiced for almost a month… Our costumes are ready too.”The royal family of Vadodara has also organised a heritage garba at the Motibaug palace. Apart from the major commercial garbas, several other organisers have also decided to add “unique” features to garbas this year.In Anand and Kheda districts, several Garba organisers are expecting NRI players, who have come down to celebrate Navratri. Ashmit Patel, a resident of Anand, who has arrived from the US along with his family, said, “We are here for 10 days… It is a great feeling to be in India and in our hometown for Navratri because despite the best of things we get to organise the festivals there, the feel, flavour and fervour of being in Gujarat for garbas is something different. We did not want to miss it.”Newsletter | Click to get the day’s best explainers in your inboxOrganisers have also increased their insurance costs this year, following the bad weather forecast for Navratri, to as high as Rs 6.5 crore for one garba venue in Vadodara. UWB has also brought in special soil to ensure fast draining of water in case of rain.Tarak Patel said, “Given the indications for rain during the nine nights, we have used special sand that would allow the ground to be dried faster.”

All roads lead to garba grounds after Covid lull
Mumbai weather: Cloudy skies with moderate rain today, orange alert for city and Thane tomorrow
The Indian Express | 2 months ago | |
The Indian Express
2 months ago | |

Mumbai will have generally cloudy skies with moderate rain Wednesday, and heavy rainfall is expected at isolated places in the city, said the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC)’s disaster management department.On Thursday, the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) issued an ‘orange alert’ for Mumbai and Thane, with the cities likely to receive heavy to very heavy rainfall in a few places.For Palghar, the IMD has issued an orange alert for three days of September 14, 15, and 16; for Raigad, September 14 and 15, and for Ratnagiri the ‘orange alert’ has been issued for September 14.In the past 24 hours, until 8 am on Wednesday, Mumbai’s island city received 41.20 mm of rainfall, the eastern suburbs received 39.89 mm of rainfall, and the western suburbs received 39.04 mm of rainfall, BMC said.Maximum temperatures in Mumbai dropped by over two degrees, as Colaba recorded a maximum temperature of 28.2 degrees, and Santacruz of 27.8 degrees, and a minimum temperature of 25.2 degrees in Colaba, and 24.5 degrees in Santacruz.In a statement on Monday, Skymet weather services said, “Rainfall in Mumbai over the week is due to the depression over South Odisha which will gradually move in West Northwest direction. Usually, the low-pressure area or depression which moves across Centre parts of the country has a pull effect over West Coast leading to increased rain activities over Gujarat, coastal parts of Maharashtra as well as over Karnataka coast”.

Mumbai weather: Cloudy skies with moderate rain today, orange alert for city and Thane tomorrow
  • Mumbai weather: Overcast skies today, moderate rain toward evening likely, says BMC
  • The Indian Express

    Mumbai will witness overcast skies throughout the day Monday and is likely to receive moderate rainfall toward the evening with the possibility of thunderstorms, according to information from the BMC’s disaster management department.On Sunday evening, Mumbai witnessed light to moderate rainfall with thunderstorms and lightning, and gusty winds at the speed of 30 to 40 km, according to the India Meteorological Department (IMD), which has also predicted heavy rainfall for Mumbai throughout the week, until September 15.In the past 24 hours, Mumbai’s Colaba station recorded 55.6 mm of rainfall, and the Santacruz station recorded 2.2 mm, with humidity at 95 per cent and 90 per cent respectively. While the maximum temperature in Mumbai went up to 31 degrees, the minimum temperature was 25 degrees, according to the IMD.Between September 13 and 15, Mumbai city, its suburbs, Konkan, and Goa are likely to receive heavy to very heavy rainfall, according to private weather forecasting agency Skymet. “There are chances of widespread flash floods and water logging over these areas,” said Skymet in a statement Sunday.Rainfall in Mumbai over the week is due to the depression forming over South Odisha which will gradually move in the West Northwest direction, Skymet also said in its statement.“Although it may lose some of its intensity, but it will give moderate to heavy rain over eastern districts of Gujarat as well as over South and East Rajasthan. Usually, the low-pressure area or depression which moves across Centre parts of the country has a pull effect over West Coast leading to increased rain activities over Gujarat, coastal parts of Maharashtra as well as over Karnataka coast,” the statement said.

After 3 years, July pips August as Gujarat’s wettest month
Times of India | 2 months ago | |
Times of India
2 months ago | |

AHMEDABAD: Of the 871mm of rainfall Gujarat received this season, 61% came in July. In percentage term, only in 2018 was the July share higher, 62%, of rainfall till September 8. Experts said it is after three years that July accounted for the most rainfall rather than August, which is usually the wettest month in the state. Experts pointed to the steady increase of rainfall in Saurashtra and Kutch. "Earlier these regions would have scanty rain compared to South and Central Gujarat. Historically, North Gujarat has also remained dry. This year, Kutch has got the most rainfall of all the regions, followed by South Gujarat and North Gujarat. Saurashtra has received 90% of its seasonal rainfall so far," said a Met department official. South Gujarat and coastal Saurashtra will receive rain from the new system active over the region. The rainy spell is likely to continue this week with heavy rain in Dang, Navsari, Valsad, Tapi, Amreli, Gir Somnath, Bhavnagar, Bharuch, and Surat, as monsoon clouds travel north-westwards. Other parts of Gujarat are also likely to receive light to moderate rain. On Thursday, Umargam in Valsad got 58mm of rain, followed by 57mm in Gandevi, Navsari; 45mm in Vapi, Valsad. In all, 65 talukas got more than 1mm of rain till 8pm. In Central Gujarat, Ahmedabad, Anand, Kheda and Vadodara districts also got rain. This year's rain so far has been the second highest in five years, with 110.5% of the long-term average, surpassed only by 116% in 2020. Of the four major cities, only Ahmedabad has got 100% of its annual rain so far.

After 3 years, July pips August as Gujarat’s wettest month
Heavy rainfall likely in state on September 9 and 10: IMD
The Indian Express | 2 months ago | |
The Indian Express
2 months ago | |

THE INDIA Meteorological Department (IMD) issued a heavy rainfall warning for Gujarat for September 9 and 10. To review the situation, the weather watch group held a meeting on Tuesday at State Emergency Operation Centre (SEOC) in Gandhinagar.With a system being formed in the Bay of Bengal, southern and Saurashta districts of Gujarat are expected to report heavy to very heavy rainfall on September 9 and 10.“Heavy rain is very likely at isolated places in the districts of South Gujarat including Navsari, Valsad and Dang,” the IMD forecast issued Tuesday stated.Also, light thunderstorm with lightning and surface wind less than 40 kmph (in gust) accompanied with light to moderate rain are expected in all the districts of South Gujarat; in other districts including Ahmedabad, Anand, Aravalli, Dahod, Gandhinagar, Kheda, Mahisagar and Panchmahal; in the districts of Saurashtra and in Diu, it further alerted.On September 10, heavy to very heavy rains are expected along with Navsari and Valsad, in the districts of Saurashtra including Amreli, Gir Somnath and in Diu.Also, heavy rain is very likely expected in the districts of Chhota Udepur, Narmada, Surat, Dangs and Tapi; in Saurashtra including Surendranagar, Junagadh, Bhavnagar and Botad.“Light thunderstorm with lightning and surface wind less than 40 kmph (in gust) accompanied with light to moderate rain very likely at isolated places in all the districts of Gujarat region, Saurashtra and in Diu, Daman, Dadra Nagar Haveli,” the IMD cautioned.

Heavy rainfall likely in state on September 9 and 10: IMD
Amid widespread rain, 98 Gujarat dams on high alert
Times of India | 2 months ago | |
Times of India
2 months ago | |

AHMEDABAD: Widespread rain in the state has led to 98 dams being put on ‘high alert’, 18 dams on ‘alert’ and warnings were issued for 14 dams. The state emergency operations centre (SEOC) said parts of Saurashtra, north and south Gujarat will get light rain in next 24 hours. On Tuesday, the water level in the Sardar Sarovar was 136.7 metres, or 93.42% of its capacity. The total seasonal rainfall in the state on Tuesday was 100.98% of the long-term average. This figure was merely 42.35% at this time last year, a government statement said. Relief commissioner Harshad Patel presided over a review meeting of the weather watch committee at the SEOC on Tuesday. Preparations being made at reservoirs which have been placed on alert were also reviewed at the meeting. Other 206 dams are cumulatively 79.30% full. The dams now have storage of 12,533.7 million cubic metres (MCM), compared to 4,084.6 MCM on August 30 last year. The storage in north Gujarat deams increased to 1,668.6 MCM on Tuesday.

Amid widespread rain, 98 Gujarat dams on high alert
  • 98 dams on high alert in Gujarat
  • Times of India

    AHMEDABAD: Widespread rain in the state has led to 98 dams being put on ‘high alert’, 18 dams on ‘alert’ and warnings were issued for 14 dams. The state emergency operations centre (SEOC) said parts of Saurashtra, north and south Gujarat will get light rain in next 24 hours. On Tuesday, the water level in the Sardar Sarovar was 136.7 metres, or 93.42% of its capacity. The total seasonal rainfall in the state on Tuesday was 100.98% of the long-term average. This figure was merely 42.35% at this time last year, a government statement said. Relief commissioner Harshad Patel presided over a review meeting of the weather watch committee at the SEOC on Tuesday. Preparations being made at reservoirs which have been placed on alert were also reviewed at the meeting. Other 206 dams are cumulatively 79.30% full. The dams now have storage of 12,533.7 million cubic metres (MCM), compared to 4,084.6 MCM on August 30 last year. The storage in north Gujarat deams increased to 1,668.6 MCM on Tuesday.

Explained: Pakistan’s monster monsoon
The Indian Express | 2 months ago | |
The Indian Express
2 months ago | |

While Europe, China and some other regions of the world are experiencing a severe drought, Pakistan is facing one of the worst floods in its recent history. Reports say about 110 of the 150 districts in the country are affected by the flooding. Pakistan’s National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) said on Sunday that over 1,000 people were confirmed dead in the floods so far.The flooding, the result of an unusually wet monsoon season in Pakistan this year, started in July, but has worsened over the last couple of weeks. The regions of Sindh and Balochistan, comprising the western half of Pakistan, have been badly hit, although Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa too have been affected.Worse than superflood of 2010Pakistan’s Minister for Climate Change Sherry Rehman on Sunday shared data from Pakistan’s NDMA that said nearly 33 million people, about 15% of the country’s population, had been affected by the floods. That makes this a more widespread flooding event than the one in 2010, described as a ‘superflood’ in which about 20 million people were affected, according to most assessments. More than 2,000 people are supposed to have been killed in the 2010 event.Pakistan’s Dawn newspaper reported on Sunday that “more than half of Pakistan” was currently under water, and that millions had been rendered homeless. At least half a million people had been evacuated and shifted to safer places, news reports said, citing Pakistan’s NDMA. News television has been running eyewitness accounts about people, especially children, getting swept by raging rivers. Several people are reported to have died in house collapses triggered by flash floods and landslides in the hilly areas.Pakistan Meteorological Department (PMD) has said that most of the country was likely to remain dry — “hot and humid” — over the next two days, but some rain was expected in the upper catchments of the major rivers. That means the flow in the rivers is unlikely to subside for the next few days.The Flood Forecasting Division of the PMD in its bulletin on Sunday warned that the Kabul river, which originates in Afghanistan and flows through the northern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province before joining a tributary of the Indus river not very far from Islamabad, was in a “very high flood level” near Nowshera city, and that this situation was likely to continue for at least one more day. The Indus was flowing at “high flood level” near Chashma town in Punjab and Sukkur in Sindh province, it said.An extremely wet monsoonThe current flood is a direct result of an extremely wet monsoon season this year. The same southwest monsoon that brings the bulk of India’s annual rainfall causes rain in Pakistan as well. The monsoon season in Pakistan, however, is a little shorter than in India. That is because the rain-bearing monsoon winds take time to travel northward from India into Pakistan. The official monsoon season in Pakistan begins on July 1 and extends until September, although most of the rainfall happens during the months of July and August. The active rainfall season is only one and a half months.The normal rainfall for Pakistan as a whole during this three-month monsoon season is 140 mm, according to PMD. But because the season is quite short, there is a wide variation in the monsoon rainfall every year.This year, the country saw plenty of rain from late June itself. But August has been exceptionally wet. Minister Rehman shared PMD data that showed until Friday, August had produced two and a half times its normal rainfall — 176.8 mm against the expected 50.4 mm. In Sindh, it has rained almost eight times the normal amount during this period; Balochistan has received over five times more.“Pakistan has never seen an unbroken cycle of monsoon like this. Eight weeks of non-stop torrents have left huge swathes of the country under water. This is no normal season. This is a deluge from all sides, impacting 33 million plus people which is the size of a small country,” Rehman said on Twitter.Thus far in this season, Pakistan has already received 354.3 mm of rain, more than three times the normal of 113.7 mm until this time. Rehman said Pakistan is currently witnessing the eighth spell of rain in this season. Normally, there are about four to five spells in the entire season.Meanwhile, the PMD director general said that the flood situation could have been even worse but for the timely forecast. The predictions for very heavy rainfall were made in April and May, which gave some time for the government agencies to prepare.Different situation in IndiaThe rainfall situation in Pakistan has been quite different from that of India so far, though incidents of extreme rainfall and flooding have happened here as well.In August, India has received rainfall that is barely 6 per cent more than the normal. For the entire season so far, the country has received 7 per cent more than normal rainfall.Newsletter | Click to get the day’s best explainers in your inboxHowever, because India is such a huge country, the overall numbers hide marked variations at the regional and local levels. Just last week, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand experienced torrential rainfall, triggering landslides and flashfloods that killed over 30 people.In August, central India, comprising mainly Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, and parts of Rajasthan, Gujarat, and Maharashtra, has received 26% excess rainfall.

Explained: Pakistan’s monster monsoon
Gujarat: Decade’s fastest 100% rainfall in 70 days
Times of India | 3 months ago | |
Times of India
3 months ago | |

AHMEDABAD: This year, monsoon kept its date with the state on June 15, the official date on monsoon onset as taught in state textbooks since decades with 2% seasonal rains. On the morning of August 24, 70 days into the monsoon season, the seasonal rainfall crossed the 100% mark as Gujarat recorded 852 mm rain against average annual rainfall of 850 mm. This, according to experts, is the fastest coverage of seasonal rainfall at least in the past decade in terms of rain days. More good news is that all the regions got ample rainfall in different spells due to near-continuous formation of favourable weather systems. For example, Kutch district has got 55% higher rains than its annual average already, whereas districts in north Gujarat have already received 8% excess seasonal rains. Manorama Mohanty, head of India Meteorological Department (IMD) Gujarat, said 2022 saw Gujarat receive some of the highest rainfalls in the past few years. "In terms of two sub-regions of IMD, Kutch and Saurashtra got 52% excess rains so far, whereas the figure for rest of Gujarat is 32%. With favourable conditions, we expect the rainfall to continue in the state in coming days," she said. She added that IMD forecast had pointed at normal or above normal rainfall, which proved to be true. Manorama Mohanty, head of India Meteorological Department (IMD) Gujarat added that the IMD forecast for central India including Gujarat had pointed at normal or above normal rainfall, which proved to be true. "This year, both the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea got activated during monsoon. This is not a common occurrence and rendered conditions favourable for the state to get good rains. Moreover, there is a gradual change in rain pattern as Kutch, Saurashtra and north Gujarat have got ample rains," she said, adding that this year the state has received sustained rains. In July, heavy rains in parts of south Gujarat and Saurashtra disrupted normal lives, whereas Ahmedabad city also reported a day of torrential rains on June 10 when the city got 28% of seasonal rainfall or 219 mm in a night. Due to good rains, there's overall 81.5% water in 207 reservoirs in Gujarat. Sardar Sarovar dam is at 90% of its capacity, whereas 57 are at 100%, 72 at 70-100%, 29 at 50-70% and 22 at 25-50%. The rains however have wreaked havoc on the road conditions across the state along with a spike in vector-borne diseases, seasonal flu along with H1N1 (swine flu) and Covid due to overcast sky, said experts.

Gujarat: Decade’s fastest 100% rainfall in 70 days
  • Gujarat: Rain likely to lessen from today, says Meteorological department
  • Times of India

    AHMEDABAD: On Tuesday, the city had received 5mm of rain till 8pm, while some areas received rain till late in the night. There was heavy rain in several parts of north Gujarat with Mehsana getting 133mm till 8pm, Idar 89mm and Visnagar 88mm. In all, 122 of the 251 talukas of the state received at least 1mm of rain. With the sky overcast almost the entire day, the maximum temperature in the city was 28 degrees celsius, 3 degrees lower than normal. With the morning’s well-marked low-pressure area over east Rajasthan and north-west Madhya Pradesh, most districts of north and central Gujarat received rain. With the low-pressure area moving north-west, the intensity of the rain in the state will reduce from Wednesday onwards, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) forecast said.

  • Heavy rainfall expected in Gujarat for 3 days
  • The Indian Express

    The India Meteorological Department (IMD) has issued heavy rainfall warning in parts of Gujarat for three days, till August 24.As per the IMD forecast, heavy rain is expected in Panchmahal, Dahod, Chhota Udepur, Navsari, Valsad on August 22 while on the subsequent day, heavy to very heavy rain was likely in North Gujarat along with heavy rainfall in the districts of Patan, Dahod, Mahisagar, Valsad and Kutch.Ahmedabad is likely to have one or two spells of light to moderate rain with thundershowers on Monday. On August 24, Kutch district is expected to have heavy rain at isolated places, stated the weather bulletin.In addition to heavy rainfall warning on August 22 and 23, light thunderstorm with lightning and surface wind 30- 40 kmph (in gust) accompanied with light rain are expected across the state.On Sunday, light rainfall occurred at a few places over South Gujarat, including in Dharampur, Umergam, Vapi and Kaprada in Valsad, Khergam, Gandevi, Chikhli and Vansda in Navsari, Bardoli in Surat.Malia and Visavadar in Junagadh, Bagasara in Amreli, Ghogha in Bhavnagar and in Ranavav in Porbadar received light rainfall.The state has already recorded 97.59 per cent average rainfall this monsoon season. Among regions, Kutch region received 152 per cent followed by South Gujarat region with 108 per cent, North Gujarat region 97 per cent, Saurashtra 89 per cent and East central 80.56 per cent.

  • Ahmedabad gets 8mm, rain to lessen for three days
  • Times of India

    AHMEDABAD: The city on Wednesday received 8mm of rain till 8 pm. Across Gujarat, the rains diminished with Dhanera in Banaskantha getting the most rain, 37mm, followed by 32mm in Pavi Jetpur in Chhota Udepur, and 30mm in Umerpada, Surat. In all, 181 of the state’s 251 talukas received 1mm of rain or more. According to the India Meteorological Department (IMD) forecast, with favourable weather systems in place, almost all districts of Gujarat will continue to receive rain, but till Monday, the likelihood of heavy rain is low. On Monday, Sabarkantha, Banaskantha, Aravalli, Dahod, Mahisagar, Navsari, and Valsad are likely to get heavy rain. The city’s maximum temperature was 32.2°C, close to normal.

Power issues continue in Chakan even after Maharashtra State Electricity Distribution Company Limited meeting
Times of India | 3 months ago | |
Times of India
3 months ago | |

PUNE: Power outage continues to bedevil industries in Chakan even after a review meeting by the Maharashtra State Electricity Distribution Company Limited (MSEDCL) four weeks ago. Officials of the Federation of Chakan Industries said that frequent power outage has resulted in production losses. Deelip Batwal, the federation secretary, told TOI that due to power issues, many industries were thinking of shifting to other states with comparatively cheaper power tariffs and better quality of power. "At least 3-4 companies have shifted to Sanand Gujarat," he said. "We had hoped for a better response when the higher-ups had intervened and conducted the meeting. However, the situation has not improved even after almost four weeks. It is very disappointing and needs to be changed," he said. MSEDCL's Pune regional director Ankush Nale told TOI, "The survey is underway. It was hampered because of the holidays, rain and other factors. However, I will make sure that the survey findings are out by next week. We will conduct another meeting with the industries to redress their grievances at the earliest." The federation officials said that recurrent power failure, poor quality of electricity, high power tariffs and lack of timely response to the outages are the major issues in the industrial belt having thousands of industries from automobile, cosmetic, food and other sectors. At the last month's meeting, Nale had expressed displeasure at the frequent power failures experienced by the industries and asked the MSEDCL officials to resolve the sub-station and infrastructure-related issues at the earliest. He had promised to initiate action against officials failing to carry out their duties.

Power issues continue in Chakan even after Maharashtra State Electricity Distribution Company Limited meeting